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7 locations across Canberra

Offering a range of allied health services for every stage of your health and wellness journey.

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Injury management for everyone

From elite athletes to desk jockeys, it doesn’t matter which walk of life you come from or what your goals are, our caring staff are ready to help you out and get you back on track.

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INJURY HUB

Got pain? Find some answers

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Common conditions we treat

AC Joint Injury

Achilles Tendionopathy

ACL Injury

Acute Wry Neck

Adductor Strains

Ankle Sprains

Calf Strain

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)

Cervical Headaches

Cervical Whiplash

Concussion

Cuboid Syndrome

Digital Ligament Injuries

Distal Radius Fracture

Dupuytren’s Disease

Extensor Tendinopathy

Flexor Tendinopathy (Golfers Elbow)

Fractures

Hand Infections

Labral Tears Of The Shoulder

Lower Back Pain

Mastitis

Meniscal Tears

Muscle Contusions

Nail Bed Injuries

Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Patello-Femoral Pain

Posture

Sever’s Disease

Shoulder Impingement

AC Joint Injury

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Achilles Tendionopathy

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ACL Injury

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Acute Wry Neck

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Adductor Strains

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Ankle Sprains

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Calf Strain

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)

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Cervical Headaches

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Cervical Whiplash

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Concussion

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Cuboid Syndrome

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Digital Ligament Injuries

> LEARN MORE

Distal Radius Fracture

> LEARN MORE

Dupuytren’s Disease

> LEARN MORE

Extensor Tendinopathy

> LEARN MORE

Flexor Tendinopathy (Golfers Elbow)

> LEARN MORE

Fractures

> LEARN MORE

Hand Infections

> LEARN MORE

Labral Tears Of The Shoulder

> LEARN MORE

Lower Back Pain

> LEARN MORE

Mastitis

> LEARN MORE

Meniscal Tears

> LEARN MORE

Muscle Contusions

> LEARN MORE

Nail Bed Injuries

> LEARN MORE

Osgood-Schlatter Disease

> LEARN MORE

Patello-Femoral Pain

> LEARN MORE

Posture

> LEARN MORE

Sever’s Disease

> LEARN MORE

Shoulder Impingement

> LEARN MORE

OUR TEAM

We think they’re pretty awesome

The team at SportsCare is made up of Physiotherapists, Exercise Physiologists, Podiatrists, Strength and Conditioning, Massage Therapists and Sports Doctors who are ready to provide the highest standard of care for our clients in a safe, professional, and friendly environment. From elite athletes to desk jockeys, it doesn’t matter which walk of life you come from or what your goals are, our caring staff are ready to help you out and get you back on track.

Meet our team

CAREERS

Join the team

We are always looking for talented allied health professionals to join the SportsCare family. We are dedicated to providing quality care and customer service. If that sounds like you, we’d love to hear from you.

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The 2021-2022 WNBL season is not one that the UC Capitals will soon forget. From COVID-19 restrictions to on-court injury, the UC Caps have experienced it all. Following a sponsorship of the 20-21 season, SportsCare teamed up with the UC Caps throughout the season past to provide Physiotherapy services and management, allowing our staff to support local elite sport both courtside and in-clinic.   

We talked to SportsCare Physiotherapist Robert Taylor about his experience working with the team in the 2021-2022 season.   

A WNBL Season in the times of COVID-19 

The UC Capitals were no stranger to COVID-19-related incidents within the past season, with team exposures, several game reschedules, and increasing restrictions ultimately leading to the team opting out of the semi-finals to prioritise player welfare.   

Rob remembered his time within the season saying, “It was possibly the most interesting period I have ever worked in elite sport. Certainly the most disruptive and the most schedule changes I have ever experienced.”   

Rob refers to the 40 (or so) schedule changes that occurred throughout the season, with the UC Caps team often having to skip games due to opposition teams contracting COVID-19 and being unable to play.   

The restrictions tested everybody, from the athletes to support staff, with limited accessibility to unwind and participate in the usual recreational activities seen when travelling around Australia to games.   

“It’s not so much for us as the support staff, but for the girls it took a toll because they couldn’t relax and do what they would normally do to mentally prepare for games,” Rob said. 

Learning from the UC Caps  

Despite having extensive experience as a Physiotherapist for elite sporting teams, this was the first time Rob had worked in basketball. He was able to bring prior experience working with jumping sports like volleyball and gymnastics, but reflecting on the importance of understanding the sport you are working with, he said, “It was extremely valuable to learn how the game of basketball works and what the players go through for direct management and preventative measures”.  

Throughout his season with the Caps, Rob observed the extent that external influences can impact a season, especially in the realm of women’s sport.   

Despite the challenges throughout the season, the Caps’ did not lose their team spirit and the home crowd’s enthusiasm did not diminish. Rob recalls the culture of the UC Capitals through his experience with the team, saying:  

“It was probably the most harmonious team I have ever been a part of across any sport. It was a surprisingly calm group of people to work with, considering the uncertainty throughout the season and impact on the players.” 

All the players are talented, professional athletes and there are a few big personalities. Brittney Sykes (known as Slim), who was named WNBL’s 2021-22 Robyn Maher Defensive Player of the Year, comes to mind for Rob.  

“She didn’t pull her punches, that’s for sure. She tells you exactly what is on her mind and it’s a pretty funny mind at times. Slim also brought a lot of energy and passion to the team, which was great to work with and observe in the team,” Rob said.  

The Caps farewelled Head Coach Paul Gorris after six successful seasons with the team at the wrap-up of the 21-22 season. Gorry moved to the United States for an Assistant Coach role with the Atlanta Dream in the WNBA. His team are currently in the top half of the ladder, and we wish him the best of luck! 

You can book a physio appointment with Rob at our Barton and Bruce clinics online or call 1800 001 500 to book via phone.  

Keep up with the UC Capitals on Facebook or Instagram, or visit wnbl.basketball/uc-capitals.

It’s well-known that exercise is important for our general health. It can help manage cardiovascular health, cholesterol, and blood pressure, lower the risk of type 2 diabetes and some cancers, and plenty more. Prescribing exercise is becoming increasingly common for GPs and other health professionals, as our knowledge about how regular physical activity affects our wellbeing continues to grow.

Exercise Physiologists are university-qualified health professionals who provide education and support regarding physical activity to achieve a client’s goals, improve their general health, or manage health conditions.

We asked one of our Exercise Physiologists, Dominik from our Barton and Bruce clinics, about how Exercise Physiology is used to manage chronic diseases.

Firstly, a bit about chronic disease

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) defines chronic diseases as “Long-lasting conditions with persistent effects.”[i] They can have social and economic consequences that impact a person’s quality of life, such as prolonged pain, loss of functionality or freedom of movement, and financial strain to manage the condition/s. Australia is seeing a rise in chronic diseases due to lifestyle and environmental factors, an ageing population, and our improved ability to diagnose conditions.

There are 10 major chronic condition groups that are commonly reported on by AIHW:

  1. Arthritis
  2. Asthma
  3. Back pain
  4. Cancer
  5. Cardiovascular disease
  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  7. Diabetes
  8. Chronic kidney disease
  9. Mental health conditions
  10. Osteoporosis

In 2017-18, AIHW reported:

How does Exercise Physiology help manage chronic diseases?

Based on the individual condition, exercise can help improve the effect of medications and treatment, and can improve general health and the body’s resilience to disease (for example, improve bone mineral density and reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety). Evidence shows that participating in regular moderate forms of physical activity can delay the onset, slow down the progression, and reduce mortality in chronic disease.[ii]

Our Exercise Physiologists, like Dominik at our Barton and Bruce clinics (and we also have EPs in our Dickson, and Weston clinics), work with our clients to develop goal-focussed effective future plans that prescribe appropriate exercises and physical activity to help improve general health and manage chronic conditions.

EPs can be recommended by your GP as part of a Chronic Disease Management or Team Care Arrangement, but you can also book an appointment with an Exercise Physiologist as a private patient without a referral to improve and manage your health and chronic conditions.

Referral through a GP

First up, make an appointment with your GP about any concerns, symptoms, or to discuss management of any chronic diseases.

Following the appointment with your GP regarding chronic disease, your GP may then put you on a Chronic Disease Management Plan or Team Care Arrangements which would include a referral to an EP. With that referral, you can then book an initial consultation with one of our EPs (which you can do online or call 1800 001 500 to reach one of our clinics).

In an initial consult, an Exercise Physiologist will ask you questions about your medical and injury history to set goals for your health, focusing on improving quality of life. They will also complete some clinical assessments to objectively measure your health and relevant function, such as cardio-respiratory testing, grip strength, balance tests, and other tests. These assessments help your EP develop an exercise program tailored specifically for you. At the Barton clinic, Dom likes using the AxIT System to objectively measure patients’ strength and function because it provides reliable quantitative data. Our EPs will use a range of approaches and equipment to test effectively.  

“Based on the patient’s goals, assessment results, and any special considerations or contraindications, I’ll formulate an effective future plan,” Dom said. “That plan may entail a home exercise program or exercises the patient regularly does with me in-clinic.”

After that initial consultation, your EP will be in touch with your GP periodically to report on progress and milestones as needed for a Chronic Disease Management Plan.

You may then see your EP once or twice a week or once every few weeks (depending on your case) to complete monitored exercises and review your program according to how your body is responding. Clients on a Chronic Disease Management Plan or Team Care Arrangement may be eligible for rebates.

How it works as a private patient

You don’t need a referral for an Exercise Physiologist, so you can book an initial consultation with an EP to achieve health and/or fitness goals, such as improve your general health or improve function after a surgery or injury, or simply manage your health and wellbeing, such as reducing pain caused by arthritis or improve your mental health. You can book an initial consultation online or via phone.

Our EPs will use the same approach for your initial consult, discussing your current condition, needs and goals, assessing your fitness, strength, and function as needed, and formulating a plan to help you achieve your goals and improve quality of life. That plan can be delivered via the smartphone app we use, called PhysiApp, emailed as a PDF to the patient, or printed for the client to have a hardcopy.

Private patients will then have follow-up sessions with their EP as needed for their case, which could be once a week for a short period of time to closely monitor early function and progress, or once every 4-6 weeks. Once you’re comfortable with your program, you might check in with your EP every 8 weeks to switch up your program as needed or simply book an appointment to address any concerns or new goals. Your EP will advise you on how frequently they recommend you attend the clinic for check-ups or for program updates to be made.

How often should you see an EP?

How often you work with an Exercise Physiologist is completely up to you. Dom likes to use the dentist metaphor: there is no black and white finish date; to ensure you continue to optimise your health, regular check-ups are advised if recommended by your EP.

“Clients can work with their EP periodically for proactive management if it’s important to them, or book an appointment to address any concerns or get back to where they were after an event such as injury or surgery,” Dom said.

“We will also often work with our Physiotherapists directly and that’s a significant advantage for our clients at SportsCare. A client may transition from treatment and restoring function after injury with a Physio to improving function and performance with an EP,” he said. “We’re here to help people do what they love to do and improve their quality of life, it’s a privilege to play a role in a patient’s journey. There’s nothing better than a patient telling you they can go about their day with less or no pain,” he concluded.

Interested in booking with one of our Exercise Physiologists to manage a condition, achieve a health or fitness goal, or improve performance? Find an Exercise Physiologist and book an appointment online or call us 1800 001 500 to reach one of our clinics.


References:

[i] Chronic disease Overview – Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2022). Retrieved 1 April 2022, from https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports-data/health-conditions-disability-deaths/chronic-disease/overview#:~:text=Chronic%20diseases%20are%20long%20lasting,action%20in%20the%20health%20sector

[ii] Norton K. Position statement on physical activity and exercise intensity terminology. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2010;13(5):496-502.

So far throughout this pandemic, the main focus of the public health message has been centred around avoiding infection – and many of us had been able to successfully do this.

But as the situation in Australia has and continues to shift, and more and more of us are facing our own personal battles with COVID-19, now is an important time for us to share advice on how to look after yourself after you have recovered from the illness.

SportsCare is here to help you remain fit and healthy without putting yourself or others at risk of COVID-19, whether you’re doing everything you can to avoid it, have tested positive and/or in isolation, or recovering. Here’s what we’ve learnt from recent research and in-clinic experience:

    1. Avoid COVID-19
    2. After you’ve been infected, while you are positive or in isolation
    3. Once you have recovered

Avoiding COVID-19

Research published in 2021 indicated that regular physical activity helps reduce your risk of contracting COVID-19.1 Like other acute respiratory infections, your body’s response to the virus depends on factors including genetics, age, and physical state.

Regular physical exercises act as a modulator of the immune system. During and after physical exercise, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are released, lymphocyte circulation increases, as does cell recruitment.

Simply put, exercising helps your body produce and spread important chemicals, and accelerates the reproduction of cells. These all have an impact on the lower incidence, intensity of symptoms, and mortality in viral infections observed in people who are physically active.

Physical activity strengthens the immune system, suggesting a benefit in the response to viral communicable diseases. Thus, regular practise of adequate intensity is suggested as an auxiliary tool in strengthening and preparing the immune system for COVID-19.

However, it is essential to continue following government advice to avoid putting yourself and others at risk of contracting COVID-19. Importantly, exercise is not an excuse to leave isolation.

When you are positive or in isolation with COVID-19

It is recommended that you do not exercise while having COVID-19, even if you’re asymptomatic. However, depending on the severity of your symptoms, there are some activities you can do that have a low impact on the body.

Activities such as stretching, Yoga, breathing exercises, or working on your hand-eye coordination by bouncing a ball against a wall or learning to juggle are great ways to stay active without putting too much strain on your body.

These exercises will not only help get your blood pumping without placing a lot of stress on your body, but will also contribute to your mental wellbeing. However, if these activities cause dizziness or excessive shortness of breath, stop immediately and seek professional medical advice.

If you’re after personalised advice, telehealth appointments are available with our practitioners. These appointments are available to help you remain as active as is safely possible.

Once you have recovered

Once you have fully recovered from COVID-19, are symptom-free and have adhered to your advised isolation period, an appropriate gradual progression of resistance and cardio activity is critical to minimise the length of time it takes you to return to normal activity. Returning to pre-COVID activity and training loads prematurely can delay or prolong your physical recovery.

In an interview with The Guardian’s Manuela Callari, Professor of Exercise Medicine at Edith Cowan University, Dr Robert Newton, says that the Coronavirus can damage various organs, causing ongoing fatigue.

“The cardiorespiratory system can’t deliver oxygen to the working muscles efficiently. So what was a light to moderate intensity activity previously feels quite vigorous now.”

The Professor goes on to say that sleep and rest help your immune system to fight the disease, but it is critical to start moving again to avoid further weakening of your body about seven days after the major symptoms have disappeared.

We also recommend an initial 60-minute appointment with one of our experienced Exercise Physiologists to gather initial information such as your fatigue levels, current physical activity, and short and long-term goals for your recovery.

We recommend this is followed by three standard consultations to review and progress.

The first of these appointments would be approximately a week after leaving isolation, and then we would organise follow-up appointments in line with your goals to review progress and prescribe appropriate steps for a return to full activity.

Book an appointment with one of our Exercise Physiologists at the Dickson, Weston, Barton, or Bruce clinics at www.sportscarephysio.com.au#book or call 1800 001 500 to reach your clinic.

 

COVID-19 Recovery Resources:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2022/feb/17/how-to-move-exercising-after-having-covid-19?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

ACT Health COVID Advice:

https://www.covid19.act.gov.au/

References:

      1. Physical exercise as a tool to help the immune system against COVID-19: an integrative review of the current literature (da Silveira, M.P., da Silva Fagundes, K.K., Bizuti, M.R. et al, 2021).

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10238-020-00650-3

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